Members: Please place your sketch in alphabetical order by last name
(Use the Heading 3, not boldface, setting for the line with your name on it.)

Cristiano Ciuti

is professor at Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, France. His theoretical group focuses on the quantum optics of condensed matter systems (cavity/circuit QED, polariton physics, quantum optomechanics, mesoscopic opto-electronics). Lately, the group is investigating quantum fluids of light and the theory of strongly correlated photonic systems. Please, visit the web page http://www.mpq.univ-paris7.fr/spip.php?article1856&lang=en for more details and useful links.

Juanjo García Ripoll

is a physicist working in Madrid (Spain) at the Quantum Information and Foundations Group in the Spanish Research Council. His research topics focus on implementations of Quantum Information and Quantum Simulation ideas using various physical systems, such as superconducting quantum circuits, trapped ions and ultracold atoms. In the photonics realm, his group has developed analytical and numerical (DMRG) methods to study the interaction of qubits with propagating photons, photon-mediated interactions and, more recently, applications to boson sampling and quantum complexity. Do not be surprised to find you in some Twitter posts at @jjgarciaripoll.

Mohammad Hafezi

is an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland, and a fellow at the Joint Quantum Institute (NIST-UMD) and IREAP. His research is at the interface of theoretical and experimental quantum optics and condensed matter physics with a focus on fundamental physics and applications in quantum information science, precision measurement, and integrated photonics. Publications and group website.
Michael Hartmann
is an Associate Professor at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. His research interests comprise drive-dissipative quantum many-body systems and their implementation in quantum optical or solid state devices, in particular superconducting circuits and optomechanical devices. For more information see the group website and publications on the arXiv.

Atac Imamoglu

is a Professor of Physics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland where he leads the Quantum Photonics group. His research focuses on driven-dissipative condensed-matter systems, solid-state quantum information processing and realization of strongly interacting photonic systems.

Giovanna Morigi

is Chair Professor of Theoretical Physics at Saarland University, in Saarbrucken, where she leads the Theoretical Quantum Physics group. Her research is at the interface between theoretical quantum optics, condensed-matter, and statistical physics. Some keywords of recent works are: Statistical mechanics of structural transition in ion Coulomb crystals; Many-body physics in cavity quantum electrodynamics; Long-range interactions in quantum optics; Quantum reservoir engineering of photons and atoms. For more information see the group website and publications on the arXiv.

David Snoke

is professor at the University of Pittsburgh. His experimental group studies condensates of polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. Recent results from his group and their collaboration with Keith Nelson's group at MIT include 1) trapping polaritons in a ring trap, with observation of circulating states including half-quantum circulation, 2) measurement of the polariton-polariton interaction in the low density (non-condensate) limit, with a surprisingly large value measured, 3) very close to "true" equilibrium of polaritons observed, allowing us to tune continuously from far from equilibrium to equilibrium.

Jacob Taylor

is a physicist at NIST and the JQI and co-director of the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science QuICS. His groupfocuses on the interface between quantum information and physics. You can also follow him on Twitter @quantum_jake

Ulrich Zuelicke

is a professor of physics at Victoria University of Wellington , New Zealand. He is a theorist interested in topological quantum phases and exotic quasiparticles in unconventional materials and ultra-cold atom gases. See publications on ResearcherID or GoogleScholar .